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Philosophy

THE DEEP ECOLOGY PHILOSOPHY

Is a way of seeing yourself as an interconnected part of a whole system. Without one part of the system, it all collapses. So not only does every living creature play an important role, but if you have lost your connection with the earth, you may feel just as lost as an extinct species.

As writer, visionary, and activist Joanna Macy, Ph.D puts it: “To truly perceive all life as interconnected challenges many of our most automatic assumptions about what we are and what we need.it can lead us to see the world not as a battlefield or a trap, but as the wellspring of our body and mind, and so intrinsic to our well-being that it can be more aptly viewed as lover or a larger self.”

COMBAT NATURE DEFICIT DISORDER

“Lack of connection with our world results in depression, resignation, anxiety, increased use of drugs and alcohol, and exhaustion. Not only can the feeling of emptiness take over after not being in our natural state for extended periods of time, but it can also lead to many physical issues such as headaches, tense muscles, insomnia and frequent illness.”

THE “OFFICIAL” DEEP ECOLOGY PLATFORM

Is a way of seeing yourself as an interconnected part of a whole system. Without one part of the system, it all collapses. So not only does every living creature play an important role, but if you have lost your connection with the earth, you may feel just as lost as an extinct species.

As writer, visionary, and activist Joanna Macy, Ph.D puts it: “To truly perceive all life as interconnected challenges many of our most automatic assumptions about what we are and what we need.it can lead us to see the world not as a battlefield or a trap, but as the wellspring of our body and mind, and so intrinsic to our well-being that it can be more aptly viewed as lover or a larger self.”

1. The well-being and flourishing of human and nonhuman life on Earth have value in themselves (synonyms: inherent worth, intrinsic value, inherent value). These values are independent of the usefulness of the nonhuman world for human purposes.

2. Richness and diversity of life forms contribute to the realization of these values and are also values in themselves.

3. Humans have no right to reduce this richness and diversity except to satisfy vital needs.

4. Present human interference with the nonhuman world is excessive, and the situation is rapidly worsening.

5. The flourishing of human life and cultures is compatible with a substantial decrease of the human population. The flourishing of nonhuman life requires such a decrease.

6. Policies must therefore be changed. The changes in policies affect basic economic, technological, and ideological structures. The resulting state of affairs will be deeply different from the present.

7. The ideological change is mainly that of appreciating life quality (dwelling in situations of inherent worth) rather than adhering to an increasingly higher standard of living. There will be a profound awareness of the difference between big and great.

8. Those who subscribe to the foregoing points have an obligation directly or indirectly to participate in the attempt to implement the necessary changes.

—Arne Naess and George Sessions (1984)

Native American Poem

The old Lakota was wise. He knew that a man’s heart, away from nature, becomes hard; he knew the lack of respect for growing, living things soon lead to lack of respect for humans too. So he kept his children close to nature’s softening influence.

 

It was good for the skin to touch the earth, and the old people liked to remove their moccasins and walk with their feet on the sacred earth… The old Indian still sits upon the earth instead of propping himself up and away from its life giving forces.for him, to sit or lie upon the ground is to be able to think more deeply and to feel more keenly. He can see more clearly into the mysteries of life and come closer in kinship to other lives about him.